Featuring a temple singer, the daughter of a priest and a woman with a Christian tattoo, the Ancient Lives exhibition centres on eight people from ancient Egypt and Sudan whose bodies have been preserved, either naturally or by deliberate embalming.

The British Museum acquired its first mummy in 1756 and its collection of preserved bodies has grown since. But for the past 200 years none has been unwrapped.

Technology has been critical in uncovering what these mummies reveal about ancient cultures. A full x-ray survey of the bodies was conducted in the 1960s and CT scans followed in the 1990s. Now the latest medical scanners have captured data of unprecedented high resolution, making it possible to produce 3D visualisations of eight of the museum's mummies.

These scans journey into the body through the skin, picking out the condition of the organs and skeleton in order to unlock the secrets of mummification. The mummies selected for this research project cover a period of over 4000 years, from the Predynastic period to the Christian era, from sites in Egypt and the Sudan. They reveal that mummification was used by people at different levels of society, and was not just the preserve of Pharaohs.

Also in the display are other contextual objects from the collection, such as amulets, canopic jars, musical instruments and items of food.

British Museum

Great Russell Street, London, WC1B 3DG

020 7323 8181

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Daily, 10am – 5.30pm (Fri until 8.30pm)

Closed 24 – 26 Dec and 1 Jan

Free to all

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