EO Hoppé was celebrated in his lifetime as one of the greatest photographers of the early 20th century, photographing figures such as Mussolini and the young Margot Fonteyn, yet he died in relative obscurity.

In this, the first major exhibition of his work for more than 30 years, the reputation of the man Cecil Beaton called 'the master' is finally restored. With more than 150 works, Hoppé's society portraits and those from his controversial Book of Fair Women are set alongside his photojournalism, revealing a democratic fascination with people that extended from street urchins to sovereigns.EO Hoppé was celebrated in his lifetime as one of the greatest photographers of the early 20th century, photographing figures such as Mussolini and the young Margot Fonteyn, yet he died in relative obscurity. In this, the first major exhibition of his work for more than 30 years, the reputation of the man Cecil Beaton called 'the master' is finally restored. With more than 150 works, Hoppé's society portraits and those from his controversial Book of Fair Women are set alongside his photojournalism, revealing a democratic fascination with people that extended from street urchins to sovereigns.Hoppé's uniquely intimate photographs owe much to his meticulous research and understanding of his subjects. His preference for naturalistic images set him apart from his contemporaries, yielding shots such as the appealingly everyday, almost casual portrait of the future King George VI and Queen Elizabeth. Hoppé's was a world of contrasts, and between society sittings during the 1920s he published two books on London's poor. He was one of the first photographers to use hidden apparatus (he often concealed his camera in a paper bag or parcel), and many of his images catch their subjects at their most honest and unforced.

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