Museums and galleries across the UK are subject to temporary closures. Those that remain open have safety measures in place, please remember to check venue guidelines before visiting.



This talk by Dr Anthea Harris-Fry will chart the evolution of carpets from the elaborate hand-loom patterns of the 18th century through the industrial revolution to the designs of the present day.

Highlighting famous designers such as William Morris, Charles Voysey and Lucienne Day and their influence on the carpet industry, the talk explores how design reflects and shapes the world around it. It weaves a picture of the impact of industrial advances and social and economic changes over the past 250 years on design, as consumer tastes and architectural practices evolved.

Capturing the global evolution of art and design throughout the Victorian period to the swinging sixties and beyond, it centres on design in Kidderminster, the pioneering 'carpet capital of the world'.

Dr Anthea Harris-Fry is a historian with many years of experience lecturing in early medieval archaeology, most recently at the University of Birmingham. She has turned her research skills to the rich industrial history of Kidderminster and Wyre Forest area and leads the Museum of Carpet's learning programme – and can often be found weaving on hand looms in the galleries. She is also a Friend of the Gordon Russell Design Museum.

Talk


Gordon Russell Design Museum

15 Russell Square, Broadway, Worcestershire, WR12 7AP

01386 854695

Website

Opening times

Temporarily closed - Opening 18 May

We will be limiting the number of visitors allowed into the Museum at any one time - please pre-book a time slot via our Art Fund ticketing page: https://gordon-russell-design-museum.arttickets.org.uk/gordon-russell-design-museum/2020-08-20-general-admission.

For full details of the safety procedures we have put in place please visit: https://www.gordonrusselldesignmuseum.org/important-information/.


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