Alice in Wonderland

This exhibition of art linked to the writings of Lewis Carroll follows the example of the author's timeless plots and explores a host of intriguing topics.

There will be work by artists the author counted among his friends " Rossetti and Millais; works mentioned in his diaries by William Holman Hunt and Arthur Hughes; John Tenniel's preliminary drawings for Alice's Adventures in Wonderland; Carroll's own illustrations; and works by a host of major artists that drew inspiration from the books.This exhibition of art linked to the writings of Lewis Carroll follows the example of the author's timeless plots and explores a host of intriguing topics. There will be work by artists the author counted among his friends " Rossetti and Millais; works mentioned in his diaries by William Holman Hunt and Arthur Hughes; John Tenniel's preliminary drawings for Alice's Adventures in Wonderland; Carroll's own illustrations; and works by a host of major artists that drew inspiration from the books.This latter category takes the viewer on a journey through 20th-century art, beginning with the Surrealists, including pieces by Dalí, Magritte and Max Ernst and the British Surrealists, who were known as the 'Children of Alice', including Paul Nash, Roland Penrose and Conroy Maddox. Conceptual, Pop and 'psychedelic' art is represented in Alice-inspired works from Mel Bochner, Jan Dibbets, Dan Graham and others, and contemporary works by artists including AA Bronson, Torsten Lauschmann and Jimmy Robert complete the journey.

Don't miss

The exhibition provides a rare opportunity to see Carroll's own drawings, with his photographs and photographic equipment displayed alongside Victorian Alice memorabilia, programmes from early stage adaptations, and John Tenniel's preliminary drawings for the first edition of the novel.


Venue details

Tate Liverpool Albert Dock, Liverpool Merseyside L3 4BB 0151 702 7400 www.tate.org.uk/liverpool

Entry details

£3.60 with National Art Pass (Standard admission is £7.20)

Open Tuesday–Sunday and Bank Holiday Mondays from 10am until 5.50pm

What the critics say

the-guardian

Alice in art: what a promising idea for a show. Why, the images are already there in one's head. The White Rabbit, the Mad Hatter, the Red Queen and the smoking Caterpillar, the Dormouse dunked in the teapot, the Cheshire Cat's smile hovering in thin air, Alice in pinafore and pumps shrinking and growing and swimming through a pool of her own tears: every character and scene is proverbial.


the-times

This show is certainly wide ranging, moving from traditional narrative painting through filmic interpretation or performance to jumbled installation. Pieces vary from the straightforwardly illustrative to the tangentially evocative. Tone ranges from the wistfully poetic to the openly sexual.


the-independent

In the 146 years since her first appearance, Alice has grown from an over-curious little girl into an artists' muse, inspiring Salvador Dali, Peter Blake and Fiona Banner, among others.