Gerhard Richter: Panorama

Coinciding with the artist's 80th birthday, Gerhard Richter: Panorama is a major chronological retrospective that groups together significant moments of this remarkable painter's career, featuring the works for which he is famous as well as a number that are rarely seen in public.

Coinciding with the artist's 80th birthday, Gerhard Richter: Panorama is a major chronological retrospective that groups together significant moments of this remarkable painter's career, featuring the works for which he is famous as well as a number that are rarely seen in public.Richter has worked in many different styles, but he is best known for his realist paintings that mimic the blurred detail of out-of-focus snapshots. These paintings will be on show alongside more abstract pieces, glass and mirror works, portraits, landscapes and history paintings dealing with some of most troubled episodes of the 20th century.

Don't miss

Alongside works responding to historical events, the show presents many of Richter's most ambitious abstract paintings " from his 1974 colour chart containing 4096 different coloured squares, to his 20-metre long Stroke of 1980 (presented for the first time outside Germany), to the magisterial and richly coloured Forest squeegee paintings of 1990, and culminating in the hauntingly beautiful six-part series Cage from 2006 on long loan to Tate.


Venue details

Tate Modern Bankside London SE1 9TG 020 7887 8888 tate.org.uk

Entry details

£7 with National Art Pass (Standard admission £14)

Sunday – Thursday, 10am – 6pm

Friday and Saturday, 10am – 10pm

Last admission into exhibitions 5.15pm (Friday and Saturday 9.15pm)

To book visit the Tate website or call 020 7887 8888

What the critics say

the-telegraph

Subtitled Panorama, the Tate's exhibition presents an admirably comprehensive overview of five decades of Richter's work, from the deliberately blurry Sixties paintings based on photographs, to the series of beautiful later abstract paintings that were created with the help of a squeegee.


the-guardian

Walking through Panorama, Tate Modern's Gerhard Richter retrospective, is like turning the dial on an old radio. Things erupt from the static as you swim between stations. Suddenly there is a voice, a garbled news broadcast, a shrill single tone, a story being told, music, then silence.


the-times

Gerhard Richter is widely acclaimed as the world's most important painter. Panorama, a major retrospective at Tate Modern staged to coincide with his 80th birthday and spanning a career that covers almost fifty years, will go a long way to convincing even the most sceptical, and he certainly convinced me.