Choose your favourite Art Fund work of 2019

Vote for your favourite work of the year and you could win a National Art Pass.

From the Dorothea Tanning's surrealist Tableau Vivant to Margaret Gillie's lost portrait of Charles Dickens, we've helped museums and galleries across the UK make a range of fantastic acquisitions during 2019. From all the incredible works of art we’ve helped buy with your support this year, we’ve chosen a shortlist of 10. Vote for your favourite and you could win a National Art Pass (plus one) worth £108.

The poll closes on Wednesday 11 December at 12noon. Please download and read the terms and conditions before entering.


Choose your favourite Art Fund work of 2019


John Akomfrah, Mimesis: African Soldier, 2018

John Akomfrah, Mimesis: African Soldier, 2018

Glasgow Museums / Bristol Museum & Art Gallery


A powerful addition to Bristol and Glasgow Museums’ collections, visibly telling the stories of people from the Commonwealth who were called on to serve in war for Britain.

Unknown artist, The Spanish Armada off the Coast of England, c1590-1610

Unknown artist, The Spanish Armada off the Coast of England, c1590-1610

Ulster Museum, Belfast


This detailed miniature painting believed to be by a Flemish artist presents a vivid depiction of the defeat of the Spanish Armada by the British navy in 1588.

Joseph Gott, Greyhound with Puppies, 1825

Joseph Gott, Greyhound with Puppies, 1825

Barber Institute of Fine Arts, Birmingham


This marble sculpture is a fine example of the neoclassical style that flourished across Europe in the mid-18th century.

JMW Turner, Walton Bridges, 1806

JMW Turner, Walton Bridges, 1806

Norwich Castle Museum & Art Gallery


This early oil painting by Turner may be the first he composed directly from nature and is a centrepiece of the gallery's early-19th-century collection.

Robert Howlett, Brunel in front of the launching chains of SS Great Eastern, 1857

Robert Howlett, Brunel in front of the launching chains of SS Great Eastern, 1857

Brunel Museum


This iconic photograph is both a defining image of Brunel and a reminder of the ambition and might of Victorian engineering.

Margaret Gillies, Portrait of Charles Dickens, 1843

Margaret Gillies, Portrait of Charles Dickens, 1843

Charles Dickens Museum


This fine portrait of the 31-year-old author was exhibited at the Royal Academy summer exhibition in 1844 before disappearing for 130 years. It now takes pride of place at the Dickens Museum.

Dorothea Tanning, Tableau Vivant, 1954

Dorothea Tanning, Tableau Vivant, 1954

Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh


This cryptic work featuring Tanning's dog Katchina was included in the artist’s first exhibition in Britain and draws on Surrealist themes of power, love, humour and eroticism.

Adeela Suleman, After All It's Always Somebody Else Who Dies, 2017

Adeela Suleman, After All It's Always Somebody Else Who Dies, 2017

Manchester Art Gallery


This ornate repousse steelwork echoes the decorative traditions of the Mughal style and is a memorial to the victims of violence in the artist's home city of Karachi.

Lawrence Toynbee, Mid-Week Practice at Stamford Bridge, 1953

Lawrence Toynbee, Mid-Week Practice at Stamford Bridge, 1953

National Football Museum


This atmospheric painting shows the Chelsea players practising at their home ground and depicts the look of the stadium in the 1950s, during a period of transformation for the club.

Carlo Dolci, St Agatha, c1665-70

Carlo Dolci, St Agatha, c1665-70

Osterley House, Isleworth


This devotional picture of the Christian martyr St Agatha was originally hung in Osterley House in the 18th century and now returns to grace its Yellow Breakfast Room.