National Museum Wales purchases work by Walter Sickert

  • 14 September 2011

The National Museum Wales has bought The Rialto Bridge and the Palazzo dei Camerlenghi c.1902-04 by Walter Richard thanks to a significant grant from the Art Fund and a contribution from the Derek Williams Trust.

Walter Sickert, The Rialto Bridge and Palazzo dei Camerlenghi, National Museum Wales © Estate of Walter R. Sickert. All rights reserved, DACS 2011.

Walter Sickert, The Rialto Bridge and Palazzo dei Camerlenghi, National Museum Wales

The National Museum Wales has bought The Rialto Bridge and the Palazzo dei Camerlenghi c.1902-04 by Walter Richard Sickert thanks to a significant grant from the Art Fund and a contribution from the Derek Williams Trust.

The painting

The new painting will be an important addition to the museum's display ‘British Art around 1900: Looking to France’. The work illustrates the international cross-currents between Britain and France which the exhibition aims to demonstrate. The painting is a fine example, both of the influences which affected Sickert’s work and his development of innovative techniques.

The work will also compliment other Venetian works by artists in the Museum collection such as Antonio Canaletto, Monet, Whistler, Eugène Boudin, Frank Brangwyn and the recently acquired works, View of the Palazzo Loredan dell’Ambasciatore on the Grand Canal, Venice by Francesco Guardi and Venice, Evening by Howard Hodgkin.

The artist

Walter Richard Sickert became one of the most influential artists in the development of figurative art in early 20th century British Modernism. In London he studied at the Slade School then with James McNeill Whistler. He also spent periods living in France and was profoundly influenced by the Impressionists, in particular Edgar Degas and Claude Monet. Sickert became a leading figure in the New English Art Club, and later the Camden Town Group and the Euston Road School.

Sickert made a number of prolonged trips to Venice and in 1898 he moved his main residence from London to Dieppe and began increasingly to court the Parisian and French art worlds while gradually withdrawing his association with the New English Art Club and other exhibitions in London, until he returned there definitively in 1905.