Celebrating Contemporary: Filter by Antony Gormley

  • 7 September 2011

Day five of our Celebrating Contemporary season looks British artist Antony Gormley's suspended sculpture Filter.

Antony Gormley, Filter, 2002 © Antony Gormley

Antony Gormley, Filter, 2002

Day five of our Celebrating Contemporary season looks British artist Antony Gormley's suspended sculpture Filter.

The work

Unlike Gormley's earlier pieces, in which the human form was solid or encased, Filter is a more open work. Constructed from metal rings, it allows the viewer to see within the body, examining the relationship between interior and exterior form.

The piece is suspended in mid-air, suggesting flight, levitation, or perhaps an out-of-body experience. Filter can be seen in Manchester Art Gallery, who bought the piece in 2008 with the assistance of the Art Fund.

The artist

Born in London in 1950, Antony Gormley studied art at Central School of Art, Goldsmith's College and Slade School of Art. An internationally-celebrated artist, he was awarded the Turner Prize in 1994 and was elected to the Royal Academy in 2003.

Gormley's art explores the human form and its relationship with space and the external world. His own body is often used as a template for his sculptures, which employ materials ranging from iron to fiberglass.

Did you know?

The 2007 British film Exodus, a modern retelling of the biblical story of Exodus, featured the burning of Gormley's The Waste Man, a 25-metre sculpture made entirely from waste.

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