Ford Madox Brown: Pre-Raphaelite Pioneer

Work, (1852 " 63)  Ford Madox Brown's highly detailed epic about Victorian society, has long been one of the highlights of Manchester Art Galley.

Pretty Baa Lambs, Ford Madox Brown © Birmingham Museums & Art Gallery

Pretty Baa Lambs, Ford Madox Brown

This autumn it will be joined by around 140 other works by Brown in the largest exhibition on the artist since 1964. The comprehensive survey follows his career from the early days, through his involvement with Pre-Raphaelitism, and the years he spent working on the murals for Manchester's Town Hall.Work, (1852 " 63)  Ford Madox Brown's highly detailed epic about Victorian society, has long been one of the highlights of Manchester Art Galley. This autumn it will be joined by around 140 other works by Brown in the largest exhibition on the artist since 1964. The comprehensive survey follows his career from the early days, through his involvement with Pre-Raphaelitism, and the years he spent working on the murals for Manchester's Town Hall.

Don't miss

The other major piece joining Work for the first time is Brown's famous The Last of England (1852 " 55), painted with particularly realistic details, these two works demonstrate Brown's Hogarthian and Dickensian approach to portraying the social problems of the age. Brown was determined to illustrate his contemporary society in a particularly honest way, and these works do just that.Restaurant discountGet 10% off your bill at the Manchester Art Gallery restaurant with your National Art Pass.


Venue details

Manchester Art Gallery Mosley Street, Manchester Greater Manchester M2 3JL 0161 235 8888 www.manchestergalleries.org

Entry details

Free entry with National Art Pass

(Standard entry £8)

Tuesday - Sunday: 10am - 5pm

What the critics say

the-guardian

Brown may not be the best known of pre-Raphaelite artists, but those staging the exhibition will argue that he deserves to be seen as one of the most important " a true pioneer and radical who was decades ahead of his time.


the-times

Ford Madox Brown was an histrionic painter of minutely detailed narratives. His compositions are as energetic as his palette is strong. And it's perfectly likely that this is not to your taste; but don't let this detract from your interest in a new show.


the-telegraph

Since Manchester Art Gallery comprehensively messed up their big Holman Hunt exhibition two years ago, I'm delighted to report that this show couldn't be better. They've borrowed all the showstoppers and spared us the duds. The installation is dignified and the catalogue by Julian Treuherz, Angela Thirwell and Kenneth Bendiner first class.


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